New, and often very elaborate, dynamic notations

“[Scott] Liddell and [Robert] Johnson see signing not as a succession of instantaneous “frozen” configurations in space, but as continually and richly modulated in time, with a dynamism of “movements” and “holds” analogous to that of music or speech. They have demonstrated many types of sequentiality in ASL signing – sequences of handshapes, locations, nonmanual signs, local movements, movements-and-holds – as well as internal (phonological) segmentation within signs. The simultaneous model of structure is not able to represent such sequences, and may indeed prevent their being seen. Thus it has been necessary to replace the older static notions and descriptions with new, and often very elaborate, dynamic notations, which have some resemblances to the notations for dance and music.”

(page 88)

Oliver Sacks, Seeing Voices. Berkeley: U of California P, 1989.

“Installation” is

“”Installation” is the art form that takes note of the perimeters of that space and reconfigures it.”

(page 109)

Erika Suderberg qtd in: Holly Rogers. Sounding the Gallery: Video and the Rise of Art-Music. Oxford: OUP, 2013.

Found while browsing the stacks at the Belzer Library, SFU.

Innumerable spatial patterns nested, three-dimensionally

“We see then, in Sign, at every level – lexical, grammatical, syntactic, a linguistic use of space: a use that is amazingly complex, for much of what occurs linearly, sequentially, temporally in speech, becomes simultaneous, concurrent, multileveled in Sign. The “surface” of Sign may appear simple to the eye, like that of gesture or mime, but one soon finds that this is an illusion, and what looks so simple is extraordinarily complex and consists of innumerable spatial patterns nested, three-dimensionally, in each other.”

(page 87)

Oliver Sacks, Seeing Voices. Berkeley: U of California P, 1989.

The impossibility of a non-texted art environment

“O’Doherty recognises the impossibility of a non-texted art environment, remarking that it is always an intertextual space defined by commerce, aesthetics, the artists, and their audiences: “The white wall’s apparent neutrality is an illusion. It stands for a community with common ideas and assumptions.””

(page 103)

Holly Rogers. Sounding the Gallery: Video and the Rise of Art-Music. Oxford: OUP, 2013.

Found while browsing the stacks at the Belzer Library, SFU.

To see thought in its wildness, in its beauty, in its oddity

“Yet if so much of our thinking and feeling is connected with seeing, some residue of visual emotion which is of no use either to painter or to poet may still await the cinema. That such symbols will be quite unlike the real objects which we see before us seems highly probable. Something abstract, something which moves with controlled and conscious art, something which calls for the very slightest help from words or music to make itself intelligible, yet justly uses them subserviently – of such movements and abstractions the films may, in time to come, be composed. Then, indeed, when some new symbol for expressing thought is found, the film-maker has enormous riches at his command. The exactitude of reality and its surprising power of suggestion are to be had for the asking. Annas and Vronskys – there they are in the flesh. If into this reality he could breathe emotion, could animate the perfect form with thought, then his booty could be hauled in hand over hand. Then, as smoke pours from Vesuvius, we should be able to see thought in its wildness, in its beauty, in its oddity, pouring from men with their elbows on a table; from women with their little handbags slipping to the floor. We should see these emotions mingling together and affecting each other.”

(page 57-58)

Virginia Woolf, “The Cinema.” Essay in The Crowded Dance of Modern Life.

Found secondhand at McLeod Books on Pender St.

The integrity and intensity of the artistic experience

“When invited to consider what helps to reduce the space-time matrix that surrounds the viewing of art, respondents mentioned the need for good lighting and seating, as well as the effective management of overcrowding and noise: the gallery workers “insisted on the importance of eliminating distractions, thereby helping the viewer to see something and benefit from it. Taken together, these suggestions relate to one of the basic conditions of the aesthetic experience: the focussing of attention.”

(page 102)

Holly Rogers. Sounding the Gallery: Video and the Rise of Art-Music. Oxford: OUP, 2013.

Found while browsing the stacks at the Belzer Library, SFU.